Location & Hours

6881 S. Yosemite St
Centennial, CO 80112

Clinic Hours

Monday 8:00am - 5:00pm
Tuesday 8:00am - 5:00pm
Wednesday 8:00am - 5:00pm
Thursday 8:00am - 7:00pm
Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm

 

Get Directions

Our Doctors Are Providers For:

  • AARP
  • Aetna
  • Anthem/BCBS
  • Cigna PPO
  • CNIC
  • Cofinity
  • Golden Rule
  • Guardian
  • Medicare
  • Pacificare
  • PHCS Rocky Mountain Health Plans
  • Rocky Mountain UFCW
  • Secure Horizons
  • Spectera (Exam Only)
  • Superior Vision
  • Tricare
  • United Health Care
  • Vision Care Plan
  • Vision Service Plan (VSP)

We also take other plans that are not listed. Please call 303-393-8378 to confirm coverage.

My Eye Card discount program

To receive membership benefits, there is an annual $25 fee per person – however as an added bonus, your first membership fee will be waived as our way of thanking you for joining.

Membership Benefits*

  • $55 OFF the comprehensive eye exam
  • $50 OFF an annual supply of contact lenses
  • $100 OFF a complete pair of glasses
  • $50 OFF sunglasses Some exclusions apply
  • 10% Discount on all other professional services
  • Exclusive pricing for Lasik surgery

Reward Benefits

  • Receive 1 point for every $1 you spend in our office.
  • For every 200 points accumulated you receive
  • $10 toward any purchase in our office. Rewards expire 18 months after issues

*Membership is not transferrable between patients, incuding family members. Cannot be used with Insurance.

 

 

At Family Eye Colorado,  our professional eye care staff will be happy to assist you with your vision needs. We have treatment options available for everyone. Whether you are interested in making an appointment for a LASIK consultation, have cataracts, need an annual eye exam, or just need glasses, we can help!

Contact us today to begin scheduling an appointment using the form below, or call us directly at (303) 393-8378.

 

Welcome to Family Eye Colorado now a part of MyEyeDr.

Elevate your Vision


Our practice proudly serves Centennial, CO including the Denver Tech Center and the surrounding area with a tradition of quality service and a friendly, knowledgeable staff. Our doctors take great pride in offering every patient the absolute best in vision services with comprehensive care – whether through fitting them with eyeglasses or contact lenses, diagnosing cataracts, glaucoma, and other eye diseases, or recommending LASIK as well as other eye surgery procedures.

Our expert optometrists and experienced staff will take the time to answer all of your questions, explain treatment options, and provide the highest quality eye health treatments available.

Built on the foundation of patient care and satisfaction, Family Eye Colorado now a part of MyEyeDr. continues to serve all of your family’s eye care needs under one roof. Come visit our friendly doctors and staff!

patient forms go here

At Family Eye Colorado, you will find a knowledgeable, loyal team of caring professionals dedicated to providing high-quality personalized eye care for the entire family.  We value our patient relationships and strive to improve quality of life and vision wellness through uncompromised service and state-of-the-art technology.  Our doctors, Kerri Shoener, Elizabeth Failla, Raza Uddin and Katie Jo Sider, work together with their staff, creating a team dedicated to meeting the vision health care needs of our patients for preventative as well as diagnostic care.

In addition to offering advanced technology to enrich our comprehensive eye care services, we carry a variety of high quality lenses to provide for your individual vision needs.  We offer a large fashionable selection of frames for your lenses, as well as top of the line products to enhance your glasses such digital, anti-glare and anti-scratch lenses to maximize your comfort and vision.  We work with multiple contact lens manufacturers to ensure we are able to offer the best contact lens choice for your eye health and vision.  We also fit several types of custom specialty lenses for patients that require a more unique lens to meet your comfort or vision needs. When you visit our office, our goal is that you will leave completely satisfied and confident with your doctor, staff and services!

We invite you to refer your friends and family to our comprehensive website and our practice. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at our office at (303) 393-8378.

contact lens care made easy

Few things affect the quality of your life more than your eyes--never put them at risk. Contact lenses are prescription medical devices. To make sure your eyes and vision stay healthy while wearing contact lenses, please follow these guidelines or the instructions recommended by your doctor.

Warning: Ocular complications and/or long-term corneal damage are the consequences of contact lenses that are worn longer than recommended. Oftentimes, your lenses will still feel fine even when you are over-wearing them. Do not wear your lenses overnight unless they are approved for extended wear and your doctor has discussed this with you. Overnight wear increases the risk of infection and other complications.

Contact Lens Insertion

Contact Lens Removal

Wearing Schedule

It will take at least a few days for your eyes to get used to wearing contact lenses. The best way to insure maximum visual comfort and keep your eyes healthy is to patiently and faithfully adhere to this wearing schedule.

DayGas Permeable/Scleral LensesSoft Lenses
1 4 hours 6 hours
2 6 hours 8 hours
3 8 hours 10 hours
4 10 hours 12 hours
5 12 hours 12 hours

 

  • DON’T wear your lenses longer than 12 hours a day until your first follow-up visit with your doctor, unless the doctor has specifically told you otherwise.
  • DON’T continue use of contact lenses if your eyes become red, irritated, painful, or if your vision gets worse while wearing lenses. Immediately take out the lenses and clean them. Let your eyes get back to normal and if the problem persists, contact our office.
  • DON’T exceed the wearing times suggested, even if your lenses still feel comfortable. Studies have proven that the eye needs time to adapt to contact lenses, and your wearing schedule is based on those studies.
  • DO always remove your contact lenses at least one hour before going to bed to allow for proper oxygen nourishment to the cornea.
  • DO schedule and keep follow-up appointments with your eye doctor.
  • DO wear your contact lenses for at least 2-3 hours the day of your follow-up appointment unless you are experiencing discomfort. Scleral lenses should be worn 4-6 hours the day of your follow-up appointment.

Caring For Your Contacts

Deposits and infectious organisms, such as bacteria and viruses, can build up on the surface of all contact lenses. For this reason, it is very important to keep them clean and disinfected.

caring for your contactsThere are four steps in contact lens care--follow the care prescribed for your lenses:

  1. Cleaning removes dirt, mucous, and other debris that gets on the lenses during wear.
  2. Disinfecting kills bacteria (germs) on the lenses. Disinfecting is essential to prevent serious eye infections.
  3. Rinsing removes the other solutions from the lenses and prepares the lenses for wear.

The best way to properly care for your lenses is to develop a care routine, then stick to that routine! Remember to:

  1. Follow the directions outlined by your eye doctor. Oftentimes instructions are also listed on the packaging or the package insert for the contact lens solutions prescribed for you.
  2. Multi-purpose solutions can be used for more than one step in contact lens care. Read the label to see which functions the solutions can be used for.
  3. Many solutions can not be used together, and not all solutions are appropriate for all types of lenses. Only use solutions recommended by your eye doctor, and check with your eye doctor if you want to switch brands.
  4. When you remove your lenses, they must be cleaned, rinsed, and disinfected before they are worn again.
  5. Lenses that have been stored for more than 12 hours may need to be cleaned, disinfected, and rinsed again.
  6. Make sure solution containers are kept closed tightly, stored upright, and kept in a clean, dry, cool place when you are not using them. Keep your case clean and replace it every 2-3 months to prevent bacterial growth.
  7. Don’t touch container bottle tips to any surface to prevent them from becoming contaminated.
  8. Throw away expired solutions. (Look on the bottle for the expiration date!)
  9. Use new solution in your contact lenses case every day.
  10. Discuss with your eye doctor the care for your lenses if you wear them while swimming in a pool or hot tub.
  11. Only use approved rewetting drops for lubricating or wetting your lenses. Never place the lenses in your mouth.
  12. Do not use tap water to rinse contact lenses.
  13. Be careful with makeup, lotions, creams and sprays--consider putting on lenses before makeup and remove them before removing makeup. Also, water-based makeup is less likely to damage lenses than oil-based makeup.

Here’s what you need to watch for: redness, blurriness, light sensitivity. Remove your lenses if you are experiencing any of these 3 things. If your eyes have not returned to normal after 24 hours, please contact our office.  If you have any change in vision, comfort, or irritation, immediately remove your lenses. If there is no improvement within a couple of hours, please contact our office.

At Family Eye Colorado,our professional eye care staff will be happy to assist you with your vision needs with the variety of services and products we have available. Whether you are interested in making an appointment for an examination, have questions about services we offer or have questions about glasses, sungasses or contact lenses, we are happy to help!

Contact us today using the form below, or call us directly at (303) 393-8378.

 

We'd like to welcome you to our newly minted website. We have taken great care to ensure this site keeps you better informed about Family Eye Colorado and to provide relevant information in an easy to understand way.


Please vist our page often as we will be updating with specials and promotions throughout the year. While you are here please take time to visit our Video Learning center, in the Eye Health drop down, where you can view our entire library of eye related videos.

 

products

When considering where to purchase your eyeglasses, contact lenses, and sunwear, remember to consider the following. . .

Not all vision care products are created equally -  Across the eye care industry there is a large variance in quality and craftsmanship.  We take pride in using a wide-range of top quality materials with great product support to provide you with excellent eye care products.  We work with different manufacturers to insure we have a great selection for you and your whole family.  Our value is in knowing what products are available and what best meets your needs, based on how you use your eyes for your lifestyle.

 

Comprehensive Eye Care - We want you to have sharp vision and great comfort with your glasses and contact lenses.  That, along with the health of your eyes is our primary concern.  That is why we stand behind our products and services with great warranties and a professional and well-educated team.  Different prescriptions and types of lenses require certain frame styles and lens treatments in order for your glasses to perform well and look great, our opticians are here to guide you through this process.  We have hundreds of frames from which to choose from, including a large selection of children's frames.  We can help find the size, shape and color of frame that is perfect for each individual person.  When it comes to contact lenses, we offer a full spectrum of products.  Even if you have previously been told that you cannot wear contacts, with newer technology available and with the specialty contacts we frequently work with, there may now be an option that is right for you.

 

Lenses & Coatings

Contacts & Solutions

Sport & Sunwear

Digital lenses (also called high definition, HD or Free-Form) provide optimum vision by enhancing the lens design for each individual prescription unique to a patient.  This results in reducing distortion in the periphery and increasing  the usable area of the lens and enhancing visual comfort for each patient.  A digital lens will also calculate the prescription for the exact fitting parameters of whatever frame is chosen.

progressive lenses
 

One of the main problems with bifocal and trifocal lenses is the issue of eye fatigue. It can be difficult for your eyes to switch from one focusing power to another. Your eyes can tire, which can even lead to a headache, sore neck and sore back.

A variation of bifocals and trifocals would be the no-line lens or progressive lens. Progressive lenses provide a smooth transition from focusing on nearby to distant objects because they do not have a distinct line separating the focusing powers. Instead, a gradual change in power allows the wearer to focus on objects at all distances. Distant objects are viewed through the upper portion of the lens, while near objects are viewed through the middle or lower portion of the lens. With the additional of digital technology, a digital progressive design can be adjusted to suit an individual's precise optical requirement maximizing the design to deliver clearer, sharper vision with wider fields of view.

bifocal lenses
 

For many people, different lenses are needed for seeing at different distances. Bifocal lenses allow the wearer to look through two areas of the lens. One area focuses on distant objects. The other is used for reading. A little-known fact is that bifocals were invented by Benjamin Franklin, and his style of bifocals are still available today.

Most of the time the “reading” area is smaller, shaped like a sideways “D”, and found in the lower hemisphere of the lens. These bifocals are called line bifocals or flat-tops. If you are focusing on distant objects, you look through the top half of the lenses. To read a book, magazine, or newspaper, you look through the “reading” area. The Franklin style lenses are less common, and are split horizontally down the middle of each lens. One thing that is difficult about using bifocals is dealing with the line between the two vision areas. Fortunately, recent technologies have developed a new type of lens, called the no-line, or progressive, lens.

 

Bifocals allow the wearer to read through one area of the lens, and to focus on distant objects through another area of the lens. As the eyes age, though, a stronger prescription is often needed to read. This would be fine, but the stronger prescription that allows for reading makes it difficult to focus on objects at intermediate distances, such as grocery items on a shelf or your speedometer. Thus, trifocals are necessary for a third prescription for intermediate focusing.

Trifocals, also known as line trifocals, feature three areas of focusing power, each separated from the other by a distinct line. The three windows allow for focusing on distant objects, intermediately distanced objects, and for reading. The downside of trifocals is dealing with the lines between the different focusing powers. Fortunately, recent advances in technology have led to developments in no-line, or progressive lenses.

 

Previous to the last few years, the only materials available for use as lenses were glass and a hard resin called CR-39. But recently, high index lenses have become available. High index materials are named because they have a higher index of light refraction. Basically, they can do the same job that glass or CR-39 does, but high index lenses are much thinner and lighter. With high index lenses, you can avoid having “soda bottle” lenses.

When learning about high index lenses, you may hear many unfamiliar numbers and terms. Here are a few things to remember.

Polycarbonate

The first and still the most popular high index plastic is polycarbonate. Polycarbonate was originally developed for fighter jet cockpits. It is very strong, very light, and resistant to scratches and breaking. Most sports lenses are made of polycarbonate.

Mid-Index

Other high index materials are classified by numbers. The higher the number, the thinner and lighter the lens. The lower numbers are classified as mid-index lenses. Mid-index lenses, such as 1.54, 1.56, and 1.57, are thinner than glass, and nearly as strong as CR-39.

High-Index

High index lense are much thinner than regular glass or plastic. Talk with your doctor to decide which high index lens is right for you.

anti-reflective-coating
 

Normal eyewear often creates glare, reflections, and “ghost images.” Now all that can be eliminated with an anti-reflective coating.

What we see is a result of light being sensed by our eyes. With normal glasses, much of the light reflects off the lenses. This produces glare. It also reduces the wearer’s visual acuity. In other words, the light reflection is both a cosmetic and visual problem.

Anti-reflective coatings increase light transmission through the lenses to 99.5 percent. They make it easier to see and easier for others to see you. These coatings are especially useful for those viewing computer screens and driving at night.

Blue light from computer/LED screens is on a similar wavelength of light as harmful UV light.  Recent studies have shown that blue light from digital devices could be as harmful as UV light to the retina.  Our doctors recommend blue light coating on lenses.  Having this on your lenses can reduce eyestrain, help with tension headaches and protect your eyes from UV light.

polarized lenses
 

Glare from wet roads, light reflecting off other vehicles, and glare from your own windshield can be annoying and dangerous. To eliminate this glare, we offer polarized lenses. Polarized lenses eliminate the majority of glare, reducing eye strain and increasing visibility. Polarized lenses are the most effective means to reduce glare.

Most glare comes from horizontal surfaces, so the light is “horizontally polarized.” Polarized lenses feature vertically-oriented “polarizers.” These polarizers block the horizontally-polarized light. The result is a glare-reduced view of the world. Polarized lenses can make a world of difference for any outdoor enthusiast. Fisherman can eliminate the bright reflections from the water and actually see into the water more easily than with other sunglasses, golfers can see the green easier, and joggers and bikers can enjoy reduced glare from the road. In addition, drivers can enjoy the safety and comfort that polarized lenses provide while driving.

 

If you have ever felt frustrated at needing both prescription glasses and prescription sunglasses to accommodate an outdoor lifestyle, you should consider photochromic lenses. Photochromic lenses darken when exposed to UV rays. The change is caused by photochromic molecules that are incorporated into the lens or into a coating on the lens. When the wearer goes outside when it's bright, the lenses darken automatically. When the wearer goes back inside, the glasses become clear.

There are a variety of photochromic options available. Depending on what you choose, you can customize the lenses to your needs. Some lenses darken only in direct sunlight, while others darken in little or no direct light. Some are designed to darken while you are in the car to reduce road glare while you are driving. You can even choose the color of the tint. Ask your doctor what options are available.

scratch resistant coatings
 

If you have hard resin lenses (CR-39), you should consider getting a scratch-resistant coating. Resins and plastics are more susceptible to scratches than glass. Scratches damage the cosmetic look of the lenses and compromise their performance. With a scratch-resistant coating, you do not have to worry as much about minor scratches on your lenses.

Another advantage of scratch-resistant coatings is that most coatings come with a one-year warranty. They are a great investment to prevent minor scratches. However, it is important to remember that scratch-resistant does not mean scratch-proof. All lenses are susceptible to scratches.

specialty lenses
 

We all have heard the phrase, “Different strokes for different folks.” Well, this also holds true when it comes to selecting glasses. There are different lenses for just about everybody. No matter what your particular need, there is probably a specialty lens designed for you.

For example, a specialty lens that is becoming increasingly common is one designed for computer users. Computer lenses have “windows” designed for viewing your computer screen, documents on your desk, and distant objects. The lenses are designed to reduce Computer Vision Syndrome, or CVS, which is characterized by headaches, eye strain, neck and back aches, dry eyes, blurred vision, and double vision.

Another example is called the double D-segment lens, also known as the double flat-top lens. If you look through most of the lens, you can focus on distant objects. But you can also look through a D-shaped segment near the top of the lens to see nearby overhead objects more clearly. This is very useful if you are involved in work where you are looking at nearby objects above your field of vision, as with carpenters and pilots. The D-shaped segment near the bottom of the lens allows for reading.

Hybrid contact lenses consist of a rigid gas permeable (RGP) lens surrounded by a soft lens skirt.  This offers the vision of an RGP lens with the comfort of a soft lens.  These lenses are ideal for patients with corneal astigmatism, corneal irregularity, corneal transplant and keratoconus. This gives patients the benefit of sharper vision without giving up comfort.

These are large-diameter RGP lenses that rests on the white part of the eye (sclera) creating a tear-filled vault over the cornea, or front surface of the eye.  These lenses are very specialized and are designed to treat multiple eye conditions that do not respond to other forms of treatment.  A few of these conditions are Keratoconus, Corneal ectasia, severe dry eye / sjogrens syndrome. These lenses are made out of gas permeable material, allowing oxygen through the lens for maximum eye health.

corneal refractive therapy
 

Corneal Refractive Therapy (CRT) - also known as "Orthokeratology", is a great advancement in refractive therapy for our patients.  CRT allows you to see clearly without glasses or contacts during the day.  Specifically designed therapeutic contact lenses gently reshape the front surface of your eye while you sleep.  Imagine great vision all day without the hassle of glasses or the problems with dust, allergies or dryness that can come while wearing contacts.  This makes CRT ideal for our younger patients who are active in sports and activities.  CRT has also been shown to slow the progression of nearsightedness in children and teenagers.  No more worries about broken frames or torn contact lenses.

 

Disposable soft lenses are one of the most popular choices in contact lens wear.  These lenses are worn for a period of time and then thrown away.  They may be designed to last for one day, a couple of weeks or up to a few months.  All lenses except for daily disposable are still removed and cleaned daily for the health of your eyes.  Disposables are perfect for many patients who were told they could not wear contact lenses because of allergies or mild dry eye conditions.  They are also popular for athletes and lobbyists who do not necessarily want to wear contact lenses every day but are needed or wanted for specific sports, events or activities.

soft colored contact lenses
 

Interested in a new look?  Colored contact lenses might be the right choice for you.  These soft disposable lenses can be used to change or enhance your eye color.  Even if you do not need a corrective power for your vision, you can use "plano" colored contacts to change your eye color.  Family Eye Clinic doctors can evaluate your eyes and see if colored lenses could be a fun contact lens for you to wear.  It is important to be fit by a qualified doctor, as contact lenses (even without a corrective power) are a medical device and must be fit with care.

 

Toric lenses are used to correct astigmatism, which is a vision condition where the cornea is shaped irregularly.  In the past, the only options for patients with astigmatism were either glasses or hard gas permeable contact lenses.  Soft toric contact lenses are weighted to keep your contact in the correction position for clear vision in patients that have astigmatism.  These lenses come in most disposable options, which makes them not only comfortable to wear, it makes them convienient and healthy for your eyes as well.

 

Technology has greatly improved multifocal choices for contact lenses.  Many patients past their 40's who need reading glasses or have to take their glasses off to read, can no enjoy the comfort and benefits of soft disposable contact lenses.  There are even options for multifocal toric correction in soft disposable contacts.  Your doctor can help you determine if this is a good lens choice for you. 

 

As the name implies, these lenses are hard and gas permeable. If you’ve been told you cannot wear soft lenses, RGP lenses are often a great alternative. RGP lenses are available in specialized designs to correct just about any vision disorder.

sports lenses

If you play sports, you should keep two things in mind related to your vision: protection and precision.

Sports lenses protect the wearer’s eyes. Sports such as tennis, baseball, softball, and racquetball may see ball speeds of 90 mph or more. In baseball alone, there are over 500,000 injuries per year! But that is not the most common cause of sports-related eye injuries. Most eye injuries occur in basketball, where an elbow or a finger jabbed into the eye can cause corneal abrasions, fractured bones, retinal detachments, or even blindness. Polycarbonate lenses are more resistant to impact than glass or plastic and offer protection for 90% of eye injuries. Protective eyewear fits well, features a padded bridge, has prescription or non-prescription lenses, and has deep-grooved eyewires to prevent the lens from falling out.

The specialized lenses also optimize your vision. Depending on your sport, certain lenses are more appropriate than others. Dark, UV protection lenses are great for baseball and other outdoor sports. Golfers can benefit from gray-brown colored lenses which make it easier to outline the course. Even if you do not normally wear glasses, non-prescription sports lenses can benefit your performance. Some people think that lenses prevent the wearer from seeing the action, but many sports lenses have anti-fog, glare reduction, and scratch resistant properties. Some are also designed to maximize peripheral vision.

sun wear

To reduce exposure to UV rays and their effects, we recommend you invest in a set of sunglasses which can provide at least 98% protection from UVA and UVB rays. While cheaper sunglasses can range from poor to excellent UV protection, our sunwear lines provide top quality protection from the sun. We carry a large selection of styles and colors.

Another product to consider is a pair of polarized sunglasses. Polarized lenses block light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water. If you are involved in activities such as water sports, skiing, golfing, biking, fishing, and even driving, polarized lenses can be very helpful in reducing glare and giving a clearer view.

Finally, if you have a youngster in the family, it is never too early to fit them with sunglasses. Children under the age of 20 are the most susceptible to the damaging effects of UV light. One concern of parents is that their child will scratch, break, or lose the sunglasses; we are here to help you make the best choice for your child.

eye anatomy

Don’t remember the lessons on eye anatomy from your highschool biology class?  That’s OK—we have provided the following eyeball illustration and terms just to give you a refresher course.  And we won’t give you a pop quiz afterwards…

eye anatomy original


IRIS Pigmented tissue lying behind cornea that (1) gives color to the eye, and (2) controls amount of light entering the eye by varying size of black pupillary opening; separates the anterior chamber from the posterior chamber.
CORNEA
PUPIL
LENS
SCLERA
CILIARY BODY
CHOROID
OPTIC NERVE
MACULA
RETINA
VITREOUS

Select from the following list or scroll to learn more about the symptoms and treatments for:

 

 

When rays are focused correctly on the retina of a relaxed eye, the eye is said to be emmetropic. Emmetropia is the medical term for 20/20 vision, vision that needs no corrective lenses, contact lenses, or reading glasses. It occurs because the optical power of the eye can perfectly focus an image to the retina, giving it “perfect” vision.

The opposite of emmetropia is ametropia. With ametropia, the focal point of the eye is some distance in front of or behind the retina.  The following vision conditions are types of ametropia.

hyperopia
 

Hyperopia is more commonly known as farsightedness. As the name suggests, people with farsightedness are able to focus on objects that are further away, but have difficulty focusing on objects which are very close. This is because the eyeball is shorter than normal, which prevents the crystalline lens in the eye from focusing correctly on the retina. About a fourth of the population is farsighted. Hyperopia can lead to chronic glaucoma, a more serious condition, later in life.

A family history of hyperopia is a risk factor for developing hyperopia. Babies are often born with hyperopia but they can usually outgrow the condition as their eyes develop into the correct shape.

Hyperopia can be corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. There are also new surgical procedures that can correct hyperopia.

myopia
 

Myopia is the condition of being nearsighted. When it is an inherited condition, myopia begins early in life.  People with this condition can usually see near objects, but they struggle to see distant objects. Myopia is the opposite of hyperopia, or farsightedness.  In myopia, the anatomy of the eyeball, or globe, is longer than normal. This causes the light to focus in front of the retina, blurring the distance vision.  Myopia is corrected with glasses and contact lenses, or with laser vision correction. Laser vision correction is only recommended for people over 18 years old, when the eye has finished growing to adult size.

To correct the symptoms of myopia with glasses, lenses are used that are thicker on the edges and thinner in the middle. This is known as a concave lens, which can be cosmetically improved in higher prescriptions with a high index lens.

Myopes are also at increased risk for a retinal detachment. The signs and symptoms of a retinal detachment are flashing lights, black floaters, or a curtain over the vision. The risk of detachment is typically less than 3 percent.

amblyopia
 

Amblyopia defined

Amblyopia is also known as lazy eye. It is a condition, usually found in children, in which one or both eyes do not develop properly. An easy way to explain this is that the "eye-brain" connection does not communicate properly; therefore, the child does not know what clear vision is...or what 20/20 vision is. The eye anatomy itself is normal, but the neural pathway to the brain is not normal, causing decreased vision.

Prevalence of amblyopia

Amblyopia is one of the most common treatable forms of vision impairment in children. Its prevalence is as high as 3-5% in some studies. It is most common in infants and young children and it is imperative that this condition is caught early.  The chance of successful vision restoration goes down dramatically after age 8, therefore the earlier this condition is caught the better chance of successful treatment.

Causes of amblyopia

The causes of amblyopia are varied. A very common condition that can cause amblyopia is strabismus, a misalignment of the eyes. This occurs when one eye has an abnormal turning in or out, causing the brain to stop using the misaligned eye. Other causes may come from a high prescription such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism. In the case of these conditions, the eye’s vision is out of focus and so the brain turns off that image. Eye disease processes can also cause amblyopia. One of these conditions is known as a cataract. A cataract is a condition of the lens of the eye developing an opacity so that light cannot pass through. Abnormal retinal conditions and hereditary factors can also cause amblyopia.

Treatment of amblyopia

amblyopia treatmentIn order to increase the chances for success, this condition must be detected early. The recommended ages for early eye examination are 6 months old, then 2-3 years of age, and then school age.

Patching, or occlusion therapy

One of the most common treatments for amblyopia is patching, also known as occluding, the better or stronger eye.  This forces the brain to use the weaker eye.  An adhesive eyepatch on the skin or a slip-on patch over glasses can be incorporated for occlusion therapy. A blurring contact lens or dilating eye drop can also be used to occlude the good eye.

Surgery

Cataract, eye muscle, or retinal surgery can be incorporated to help treat the underlying cause of amblyopia in some cases.

Vision therapy

Vision therapy has been proven to be successful in the treatment of amblyopia. Vision therapy, or VT, incorporates a series of vision training procedures that helps improve eye movement control, visual acuity, depth perception, and eye coordination. Vision therapy can be done in an office or home setting.

Signs and symptoms of Amblyopia

The most common way amblyopia is diagnosed is a detection of a decreased red reflex in the child's eye.  A diagnostic instrument used by the optometrist, ophthalmologist, or pediatrician, can pick up a bright reflection in the normal eye and a dim reflection in the amblyopic eye. Upon further examination, the eye is dilated to see if a refractive error of myopia, astigmatism, or hyperopia is the cause.

Another sign of amblyopia is an eye that turns in or out. A symptom that may be indicative for amblyopia is if the child prefers the vision out of one eye.  This can sometimes be detected when occluding the better eye--the child may become fussy and upset because she cannot see out of the lazy eye.

 Citations:
1. Amblyopia informational patient brochure. APOS.org. January 2013

presbyopia
 

As people get older, usually when they hit their 40s, a condition called presbyopia can set in. Presbyopia is the inability to focus on objects near the eye. One usually notices that it is harder to read or use the computer. Bifocals or reading glasses are a way to remedy this condition.

Presbyopia is a natural consequence of the aging process. There is no known cure, though researchers are constantly looking for one. Even if someone has never had vision problems before, he can still develop presbyopia. It may seem to occur suddenly, but it actually occurs over a long period of time. Symptoms include having to hold things at arm’s length to see them clearly, eye strain, fatigue, and headaches from near work.

astigmatism
 

Sometimes the cornea is irregularly shaped, causing the eye to focus an object on two different areas of the retina. This is known as astigmatism. For the cornea to bend light correctly, it should be dome-shaped, like a basketball. Astigmatic corneas are shaped more like a football. This causes a distorted view when looking at objects which are close-up and far away.

The cause of astigmatism is unknown. Astigmatism is often associated with myopia or hyperopia, and it usually is present from birth. It may be hereditary, or it may be caused by factors such as pressure on the cornea, incorrect posture, or increased use of the eyes for “near work.”

Mild astigmatism usually does not need to be corrected. Eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery can correct moderate to high degrees of astigmatism.

computer vision syndrome
 

Computer vision syndrome (CVS) affects three out of four computer users. It is a series of symptoms related to extended periods of computer usage. Though it is no cause for panic, measures can be taken to relieve symptoms of CVS.

Symptoms

CVS can appear as a variety of symptoms. Headaches, eye strain, neck and back aches, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, double vision, and dry or irritated eyes are all possible problems related to CVS.

Risk Factors

Any computer user can develop CVS. Your vision, your computer, and the environment where you use your computer are all factors which can lead to CVS.

Our top priority is the care of your eyes. We want to keep your eyes healthy through regular eye health evaluations, communication, and education. This page lists a few of the most common eye diseases. Select from the following list of topics or scroll to learn about the causes, symptoms, and treatments for:

blepharitis eye
 

There are two types of blepharitis. Seborrheic blepharitis is often part of an overall skin condition called seborrhea, which may also affect the scalp, chest, back and the area behind the ears. The second form of blepharitis – staph blepharitis – is a more severe condition, caused by bacteria, that begins in childhood and may continue through adulthood.

Causes

Hormones, nutrition, general physical condition, and even stress may contribute to seborrheic blepharitis. Build-ups of naturally occurring bacteria contribute to staph blepharitis.

Symptoms

Blepharitis could be described as dandruff of the eyelids. Seborrheic blepharitis results in redness of the eyelids, flaking and scaling of eyelashes, and greasy, waxy scales caused by abnormal tear production. Staph blepharitis can cause small ulcers, loss of eyelashes, eyelid scarring, and even red eye.

Treatment

Careful cleaning of the eyelids can reduce seborrheic blepharitis. Application of hot packs to the eyes for 20 minutes a day can also help. Staph blepharitis may require antibiotic drops and ointments.

cataract
 

A cataract is an opacity of the lens of the eye. The body's natural lens is similar to an onion, with many layers. These layers contain protein and as the proteins clump together, they cover the lens and make it difficult to see clearly. Cataracts are generally seen in the older population, but they can occur at any age, even birth. By age 60, over half of the population has some symptoms of cataracts due to the natural aging process.

Cataracts are painless but if left untreated can lead to blindness. Cataract surgery is done on an outpatient basis with little or no downtime afterwards. The surgery is performed by a medical doctor known as an ophthalmologist, who specializes in surgery of the eye. The aftercare or postoperative care can be administered by an ophthalmologist or an optometrist.

Symptoms of Cataracts

There can be a myriad of symptoms when a person develops a cataract.  It is common for vision to be blurry, as though you are looking through a foggy window. Color vision changes occur in which the brightness of colors fade, especially blue and green. Patients with cataracts also experience difficulty in reading small print. They also feel like they need brighter light or possibly a new glasses prescription. Double vision or vision that seems like halos around the letters also occurs, as well as sensitivity to light.

Causes of Cataracts

The exact physiological cause of cataracts is unknown, but there are many risk factors. Aging and trauma are known to cause cataracts. A blunt trauma or injury to the eye can cause a cataract at any age. The effect of aging on the cells of the lens contributes to cataracts usually after age 60. There is also a direct correlation between the sun's UV rays and certain radiation exposures that contriibute to cataract growth. Smoking is a big risk factor for developing cataracts as well.

Poor nutrition can add to the risk of developing cataracts. Lack of vitamin C has been shown to increase the genesis of cataract formation. Some prescription medicines, especially prednisone, can cause cataracts. Diabetes and other chronic disease processes are also factors in cataract formation. Finally, there are genetic factors that contribute to a cataract.

Treatment of Cataracts

The standard of care for the treatment of cataracts is typically surgery. Cataract surgery, which is an outpatient procedure, removes the protein accumulation from the eye by replacing the cloudy natural lens with an artificial lens. This artificial lens, known as an IOL or intraocular lens, will have your prescription, which in most cases, makes you less dependent on glasses. Lens technology has evolved over the years to also accommodate prescriptions for astigmatism and bifocal prescriptions. Cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgeries in the United States, and it has a success rate of over 98%.

There are many types of cataracts that form on the eye, with different levels of density. This can affect the post-operative care of cataract patients. After cataract surgery, it might be necessary to use a laser to clear an after-cataract membrane that can occur weeks to months after the procedure. This treatment uses a YAG laser and is a painless, low risk, in-office procedure. Most patients can return to work or normal activities within days after the procedure. Your doctor will likely prescribe eyedrops to prevent infection and swelling.

cataract surgery 00cataract surgery 01cataract surgery 02cataract surgery 03

Recent Findings

New technology in cataract surgery includes a bladeless customized procedure that allows for faster healing and clearer vision after the procedure. This computer assisted surgery uses a laser to make the incisions. The laser also divides the cataract efficiently so that the surgeon can remove the old lens and replace it with a new state-of-the-art IOL ( Intraocular lens). This technology uses a femtosecond laser which emits cool pulses of energy. This technology has been used for decades in LASIK surgery for the correction of myopia or nearsightedness. This form of cataract surgery now allows the procedure to be more precise, and reproducible.

Citations
1. What is a cataract? Educational website release. Triadeye.com. January 13, 2013.
2.Bladeless cataract laser surgery. LenSX press release. October 4, 2012.

pink eye
 

Conjunctivitis, commonly called pink eye, is a redness of the eye. It is often accompanied by a discharge (clear, yellow, or white) and itching in the eye.

Causes

Pink eye is most often a viral infection, but it can also be caused by bacteria or an allergic reaction. Viral pink eye is highly contagious.

Prevention and Treatment

To avoid spreading conjunctivitis, wash your hands often, do not touch the infected area with your hands, do not share washcloths or towels, and avoid using makeup which may become contaminated. A child with pink eye should be kept from school for a few days. Sometimes an eye doctor will need to prescribe antibiotic eye drops and ointments to clear up conjunctivitis.

diabetic retinopathy
 

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition associated with diabetes. High levels of blood sugar may damage tiny blood vessels in your eye. New vessels may form to replace the damaged vessels. The new vessels can burst, resulting in blurred vision or even blindness.

Symptoms

Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include:

  • "Floaters” – small specks that pass across your field of vision, made up of cells floating in the transparent gel of your eyeball
  • Difficulty reading or seeing things close-up
  • Sudden loss of vision
  • Flashes
  • Blurred or darkened vision

Risk Factors and Treatment

If you have diabetes, make sure you control your blood sugar level. This will reduce your risk of getting diabetic retinopathy. If you are experiencing some of the symptoms listed above, give us a call. If diagnosed properly, diabetic retinopathy can be treated with a laser procedure or a vitrectomy.

dry eye
 

If your eyes are constantly itchy or dry, you may have dry eye syndrome, which affects many millions of Americans. Dry eye syndrome is caused by a lack of, or poor quality of, tears. Tears lubricate the outer layer of the eye called the cornea. If the tears are not adequate or are not composed of a proper balance of mucous, water, and oil, the eye becomes irritated.

Symptoms

Dry eye syndrome leads to a number of symptoms, including itchiness, irritation, burning, excessive tearing, redness, blurred vision that improves with blinking, and discomfort after long periods of watching television, using a computer, or reading.

Risk Factors

There are many factors that can contribute to dry eye syndrome. These include dry, hot, or windy climates; high altitudes; air-conditioned rooms; and cigarette smoke. Contact lens wearers, people with abnormally dry skin, and the elderly are more likely to develop dry eye syndrome. You may also be more at risk if you take certain medications, have a thyroid condition, a vitamin-A deficiency, Parkinson’s or Sjorgen’s disease, or if you are a woman going through menopause.

glaucoma
 

Glaucoma is a serious sight-threatening condition in which there is an abnormal pressure inside the eye. Typically, the pressure or IOP (intraocular pressure) is too high for the blood vessels and optic nerve to function normally, leading to loss of vision.

There are some forms of glaucoma that can occur with normal pressure in the eye. The average IOP for a healthy eye is 10 to 22 mm of Mercury. Just as a physician’s office tests your blood pressure annually, the eye doctor tests your IOP during annual eye examinations.

Types of Glaucoma

There are several varieties of the disease, with primary open-angle glaucoma being the most common. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) occurs when the IOP is higher than normal. As the pressure increases, it destroys vital nerve tissue that is irreparable. POAG usually occurs over a long period of time, months to years, and slowly causes peripheral visual field loss.  If left untreated, a sufferer progresses to tunnel vision and then to total blindness.

A second type of glaucoma is acute-angle closure. This is considered a medical emergency because the interocular pressure spikes suddenly to anywhere from 30-70 mm or higher. This causes extremely sharp pain, nausea and vomiting, and cloudy vision. The IOP needs to be lowered within hours to prevent permanent vision loss.

Juvenile open-angle glaucoma, or JOAP, is similar to POAG, in that is causes a gradual visual field loss. The most common form is in children from ages 3 to 21. Infantile or congenital glaucoma is a type of glaucoma that manifests itself between birth to 3 years of age.  A typical sign is an enlarged bluish-gray cornea, the front dome of the eye.  Excessive tearing of the eye and sensitivity to light are also symptoms.  Finally, secondary glaucoma is caused from trauma, eye disease, or certain medications.

Causes of Glaucoma

Many theories on the cause of glaucoma exist, but the exact cause is unknown. Glaucoma can be a hereditary condition. It also can be caused by malformed anatomical structures in the eye. Certain risk factors such as hyperopia and cataracts cause a higher incidence of certain types of glaucoma.

One cause of glaucoma is an insufficient drainage system of the aqueous fluid. The aqueous imbalance causes a gradual buildup of pressure which destroys vision. Another cause is an insufficient flow of blood to the optic nerve. Ocular trauma or injury that damages the anterior segment for the lens and drainage mechanism of the eye can also lead to glaucoma. In the case of normal tension glaucoma, pressure readings are in the normal range. The cause of this is unknown.

Treatment

Even though in most cases there is no way to prevent glaucoma, there are many treatment options. Medications in the form of eyedrops are commonly prescribed. Different combinations of agents act on mechanisms of action to lower IOP or to slow the production of fluid.

Advanced surgical and laser procedures can also be viable options for the treatment of glaucoma.  An in-office procedure called laser trabeculoplasty can cause the meshwork in the eye to work more efficiently. This treatment has a temporary effect and may need to be done multiple times. Another effective surgery uses a drainage implant to facilitate better outflow and inflow of aqueous fluid in the eye. These procedures help keep the pressure stabilized. Conventional surgery for glaucoma is done in an operating room scenario. A flap in the eye is created to facilitate outflow of the pressure. This pressure-controlling surgery is known as a trabeculotomy.

Furthermore, some oral medications can also be used in the treatment of glaucoma.

Methods of Testing for Glaucoma

During a comprehensive eye examination, eye pressure can be tested through various methods. Tonometry gives a pressure reading of the eye. A tomometer has different methods such as a probe that gently touches the front of the eye after the eye doctor has administered anesthetic eyedrops. Another method of testing uses a puff of air. For children, there is a tonometer that is quick and does not require anesthesia.

A pachometer, which measures the thickness of the front of the eye called the cornea, can also aid in diagnosis. A visual field device can measure for early or late damage in the peripheral fields of vision. Lastly, newer technology called OCT, or optical coherence tomography, counts the nerve fibers, which can help detect early changes in the disease.

Prevalence of Glaucoma

There are approximately 3 million individuals in the United States with glaucoma. It is the second leading cause of blindness in the country. Most cases are found in the population over age 40, and more women than men have the disease. Two thirds of glaucoma cases are in the Caucasian population, approximately 20% are African-American, and 10% are Hispanic. Glaucoma continues to rise every year in the population.

The key to success in the treatment of glaucoma is early detection and progressive monitoring of the condition. Comprehensive eye examinations and diligent monitoring will help protect from vision loss with this disease.

Citations

  1. Glaucoma. AOA pdf. AOA.org.
  2. I Care Tonometry in Children. JAAPOS. Sciencedirect.com. April 2011
  3. Glaucoma, open -angle. NEI source press release. 2010.
macular degeneration
 

Macular degeneration is a disease which affects a small area of the retina known as the macula. The macula is a specialized spot on the retina that allows us to see the fine detail of whatever is directly in front of us. Macular degeneration occurs when the macula begins to deteriorate.

“Wet” vs. “Dry”

Most often, macular degeneration is accompanied by formation of yellow deposits, called “drusen,” under the macula, which dry out or thin the macula. This is called “dry” macular degeneration. In rare cases, abnormal blood vessels develop under the macula and leak fluid. This is called “wet” macular degeneration.

Causes

A number of uncontrollable factors contribute to macular degeneration, including age, sex, eye color, farsightedness, and race. Risk factors you can control include smoking, high blood pressure, exposure to harmful sunlight, and diet.

Symptoms

It is difficult to detect dry macular degeneration in its early stages. The most common symptoms, when detected, include a spot of blurry vision, dark vision, or distorted vision. Wet macular degeneration progresses much faster than the dry variety. Both forms of macular degeneration can cause blindness.

Treatment

Currently, there is no cure for macular degeneration, but treatment is available to slow the effects.

retinal detachment
 

The part of the eye which collects light and transmits the light messages to the optic nerve and brain is the retina. It lines the inner back wall of the eye. When the retina separates from the back wall, it is known as retinal detachment. It is a serious condition which can cause permanent damage and vision loss if not treated quickly.

Symptoms

A retinal detachment often causes sudden defects in your vision. It may just cause a blind spot too small to notice, or it may cause a noticeable shadow which obscures your vision. An increase in “floaters,” which look like small particles or fine threads, may also be noticed. Finally, flashes of light are associated with retinal detachment.

Risk Factors

Eye injuries, tumors, and cataract surgery can cause retinal detachment. Nearsighted individuals and the elderly are at greater risk for spontaneous detachment. Also, diabetic retinopathy, a condition associated with diabetes, can cause bleeding which leads to retinal detachment.

just for presbyopes

Presbyopia is a Latin term for "old man eyes." This condition actually begins in your late 20s and slowly causes close vision loss. Most people develop symptoms after age 35--these symptoms include eyestrain and blurry vision while reading. Often presbyopia causes people to push objects further away to view them clearly. The treatment for presbyopia includes glasses and contact lenses, laser procedures, and other surgical procedures.

Reading glasses, bifocals, trifocals, or progressive multifocal blended lenses are all options to treat and correct presbyopia with glasses.

Soft, rigid, gas permeable, or a combination of these materials can treat presbyopia with contact lenses. Many surgical and laser techniques are used to treat presbyopia with new technology developing every year for this emerging population.

 

To reduce eye strain and fatigue, we carry specialized computer lenses. These lenses are perfect for computer users who spend a majority of their days working on computers. And since three out of four computer users will suffer from Computer Vision Syndrome, computer lenses are a great way to keep your eyesight healthy.

 

One of the first areas of your life where presbyopia becomes prominent is in your ability to read. There are a variety of styles available, with sleek designs that allow you to carry them anywhere.

 

For many presbyopes, bifocal lenses are a necessity. But it can be difficult to adjust to the harsh line that is found in many bifocal lenses. Fortunately, there are no-line lenses, which are also called progressive lenses. No more lines! Just a change in focusing power which allows you to comfortably focus on any distance. Just as with lined bifocals, distant objects are viewed through the top portion of the lenses, and near objects are viewed through the bottom portion of the lenses.

 

If you need bifocals but cannot stand wearing glasses, you may need bifocal contact lenses. Now you can have all of the benefits of bifocal lenses in the convenience of contact lenses. Talk with your doctor about bifocal contacts today.

 

For some of our emerging presbyopes we offer another option to glasses. Monovision is a method of fitting your dominant eye for distance vision and your non-dominant eye for near vision. Contacts are available in disposable, extended wear, and even daily disposable lenses to fit your lifestyle. Most patients require 2-4 weeks to make the adjustment from binocular vision to monovision.

Children with uncorrected vision conditions or eye health problems face many barriers in life, academically, socially, and athletically. High-quality eye care can break down these barriers and help enable your children to reach their highest potential. As a parent, make sure you are giving your children the eye care they need. Presented are guidelines from the American Optometric Association.

infant vision
 

Your baby has a whole lifetime to see and learn. But did you know your baby also has to learn to see? As a parent, there are many things that you can do to help your baby’s vision develop.

When your baby is about six months, you should take him to your doctor of optometry for his first thorough eye examination. Things that the optometrist will test for include excessive or unequal amounts of nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, lack of eye movement ability, as well as other eye health problems. These problems are not common, but it is important to identify children who have them at this stage. Vision development and eye health problems can be more easily corrected if treatment is begun early.

Unless you notice a need, or your doctor of optometry advises you otherwise, your child’s next eye exam should be around age three, and then again before he or she enters school.

During the first four months of life, your baby should begin to follow moving objects with the eyes and to reach for things, first by chance and later more accurately, as hand-eye coordination and depth perception begin to develop.

To help, use a nightlight or other dim lamp in your baby’s room; change the crib’s position frequently and your child’s position in it; keep reach-and-touch toys within your baby’s focus, about eight to twelve inches from his eyes; talk to your baby as you walk around the room; alternate right and left sides with each feeding; and hang a mobile above and outside the crib.

Between four and eight months, your baby should begin to turn from side to side and use her arms and legs. Eye movement and eye/body coordination skills should develop further and both eyes should focus equally.

Enable your baby to explore different shapes and textures with his or her fingers; give your baby the freedom to crawl and explore; hang objects across the crib; and play “patty cake” and “peek-a-boo” with your baby.

From eight to twelve months, your baby should become mobile, crawling and pulling himself or herself up. He or she will begin to use both eyes together to judge distances and grasp and throw objects with greater precision. To support development do not encourage early walking – crawling is important in developing eye-hand-foot-body coordination; give your baby stacking and take-apart toys; and provide objects your baby can touch, hold and see at the same time.

From one to two years, your child’s eye-hand coordination and depth perception will continue to develop and he or she will begin to understand abstract terms. Things you can do are to encourage walking; to provide building blocks, simple puzzles and balls; and to provide opportunities to climb and explore indoors and out.

There are many other affectionate and loving ways in which you can aid your baby’s vision development. Use your creativity and imagination. Ask your doctor of optometry to suggest other specific activities.

pre-school vision
 

During the infant and toddler years, your child has been developing many vision skills and has been learning how to see. In the preschool years, this process continues as your child develops visually guided eye-hand-body coordination, fine motor skills, and the visual motor skills necessary to learn to read.

As a parent, you should watch for signs that may indicate a vision development problem, including a short attention span for the child’s age; difficulty with eye-hand-body coordination in ball play and bike riding; avoidance of coloring and puzzles and other detailed activities.

There are everyday things that you can do at home to help your preschooler’s vision develop as it should.

These activities include reading aloud to your child and letting him or her see what you are reading; providing a chalkboard, finger paints and different shaped blocks and showing your child how to use them in imaginative play; providing safe opportunities to use playground equipment such as a jungle gym and balance beam; and allowing time for interacting with other children and for playing independently.

By age three, your child should have a thorough optometric eye examination to make sure your preschooler’s vision is developing properly and there is no evidence of eye disease. If needed, your doctor can prescribe treatment including glasses and/or vision therapy to correct a vision development problem.

Here are several tips to make your child’s optometric examination a positive experience:

  1. Make an appointment early in the day. Allow about one hour.
  2. Talk about the examination in advance and encourage your child’s questions.
  3. Explain the examination in your child’s terms, comparing the E chart to a puzzle and the instruments to tiny flashlights and a kaleidoscope.

Unless recommended otherwise, your child’s next eye examination should be at age five. By comparing test results of the two examinations, your optometrist can tell how well your child’s vision is developing for the next major step. . .the school years.

school age vision
 

A good education for your child means good schools, good teachers and good vision. Your child’s eyes are constantly in use in the classroom and at play. So when his or her vision is not functioning properly, learning and participation in recreational activities will suffer.

The basic vision skills needed for school use are:

  • Near Vision. The ability to see clearly and comfortably at 10-13 inches.
  • Distance Vision. The ability to see clearly and comfortably beyond arm’s reach.
  • Binocular coordination. The ability to use both eyes together.
  • Eye movement skills. The ability to aim the eyes accurately, move them smoothly across a page and shift them quickly and accurately from one object to another.
  • Focusing skills. The ability to keep both eyes accurately focused at the proper distance to see clearly and the ability to change focus quickly.
  • Peripheral awareness. The ability to be aware of things located to the side while looking straight ahead.
  • Eye/hand coordination. The ability to use the eyes and hands together.

If any vision skills are lacking, your child will have to work harder. This can lead to headaches, fatigue, and other eyestrain problems. As a parent, be alert for symptoms that may indicate your child has a vision or visual processing problem. Be sure to tell your optometrist if your child frequently:

  • Loses his place while reading.
  • Avoids close work.
  • Holds reading material closer than normal.
  • Tends to rub his eyes.
  • Has headaches.
  • Turns or tilts head to use one eye only.
  • Makes frequent reversals when reading or writing.
  • Uses finger to maintain place when reading.
  • Omits or confuses small words when reading.
  • Consistently performs below potential.

Since vision changes can occur without you or your child noticing them, your child should visit the optometrist at least every two years, or more frequently if specific problems or risk factors exist. If needed, the doctor can prescribe treatment including eyeglasses, contact lenses, or vision therapy.

Remember, a school vision or pediatrician’s screening is not a substitute for a thorough eye examination.

protective eyewear
 

Never overlook the importance of safety eyewear when playing sports. Every year, hundreds of men, women, and children are injured while playing sports. To help prevent sports-related eye injuries, athletes should use protective athletic eyewear whether or not prescription eyewear is needed. One choice is a sports frame with prescription or non-prescription polycarbonate lenses. Baseball or softball players who are hit in or near the eye, or suffer a blow to the head, should seek immediate care at a hospital emergency room or from an eye care professional.

 

The important thing to remember for parents of children who wear contact lenses is that contacts are prescribed medical devices. Contact lenses are not a cosmetic accessory. While the wearer may be happy about his or her new look, it is extremely important that the lenses be properly cleaned and worn according to the instructions of the optometrist.

vision and learning
 

There is controversy over the exact relationship between vision and learning. For example there is a negative correlation between distance refractive error and reading ability. Myopic or nearsighted children who cannot see clearly at a distance without glasses are more commonly good readers. Children who spend tremendous amounts of time reading become nearsighted. Before Alaska became a state myopia was rare. After becoming a state, more than 50 percent of the children in Alaska developed nearsightedness. Thus, correlation is such that nearsightedness or poor distance vision is highly correlated with success in reading. Restated another way, poor distance vision is associated with better reading abilities.  Farsighted children statistically are poorer readers than myopic children.

 

Some of the mechanical visual skills which are related to reading include focusing or accommodation, and eye teaming, or convergence. Fatigue of one or both of these systems may interfere with reading. There is also a relationship between eye movements such as saccades (whereby we change fixation from one target to the next) and smooth following movements known as pursuits and reading. Children who cannot make accurate eye movements are often found to skip lines and words while reading.

The visual system was originally designed so that the peripheral vision was responsive to motion detection (danger from the jungles) with a central portion for fine discrimination (to identify the source of danger; e.g., a lion.) In the school environment the child is expected to ignore the peripheral portion of their visual system and pay attention with the central portion. If the child can not ignore the peripheral portion, he/she becomes distracted.  Improvement in eye movement skills often results in less distraction and fewer errors of skipping words while reading.

loses place
 

Reading requires very accurate saccadics, which are fixations from one spot to another.  Children who have poor eye movements are easily distracted and lose their place.  Remember, the eye movement system was designed so that peripheral vision detects motion and danger.  Imagine what happens when the system works correctly in the class room.  As soon as there is peripheral movement, the eyes move toward the source of movement. This results in the complaint of inattention.  Thus, reflexive eye movement skills must be socialized so that they do not respond reflexively to peripheral information.  In addition, speed and accuracy must be trained so that one does not lose one’s place.

The skills are easily improvable with vision therapy.  Once the information is brought into the eyes, it must be sent back to the brain for appropriate processing. The information must be utilized and integrated with the sensory and motor areas of the brain. Defects in the perceptual (interpretation of visual system) and motor (the integration with output, e.g., hand-eye coordination) may interfere with the reading process. Perceptual motor skills are key in the early acquisition of reading skills. A deficit is important to identify very early on-- i.e., five to seven years of age. Remediation of the skills at a later date, such as age 12, will be less effective for reading. Thus, early identification and treatment is essential. It is evident that there is more to good vision than 20/20.

 

It has been presumed that children who reverse letters or words see them backwards.  This is false.  They have directional confusion.  In the real world direction has no meaning.  For example, a chair is a chair no matter which way it is placed.  Changing direction does not change interpretation.  In the world of language direction changes meaning.  Connect the bottom of a chair and it looks like a "b".  Turn it 180 degrees it becomes a "d", flip it upside down and it becomes a "q" and flip it again it becomes a "p".  Thus, direction changes meaning.  The difference between "was" and "saw" is direction.

 

As mentioned previously, we should correct all optical errors of the eyes (glasses); eliminate eye muscle problems; and create smooth accurate eye movements.  In addition, we should make sure that we properly interpret what we see and use it appropriately.  These are known collectively as perceptual skills and include form perception, size and shape recognition, visual memory, and visual motor integration (hand-eye coordination.)

Keratoconus is an eye disease where the front surface of the eye progressively changes from a round to cone like shape. As a result, your vision is blurry and distorted with glasses. We fit specialty contacts including hybrid and scleral lenses which enables people with keratoconus to have clear and comfortable vision with contact lenses.

Dry eyes can be caused by several factors including age , medications, heavy computer use, wearing contact lenses, history of lasik surgery and allergies. It can be a chronic or temporary condition that causes blurry vision, redness, and severe eye irritation. Often times over the counter drops provide temporary relief.  Our office has advanced treatment options, just talk to you Family Eye Colorado doctor and they can work with options best for your eyes.  BioTissue is one of those options, here is some more information - click here.

services overview

As a fully licensed and equipped optometric practice, Family Eye Clinic offers a complete range of eye care services to all of our patients.

 

Whether the eye care you need involves correcting refractive errors with eyeglasses or contact lenses, finding the perfect frame, knowing the best sunglass protection, or diagnosing and treating eye conditions and diseases, our experienced team will identify and implement the best eye care solutions for you.

Eye Health Evaluation

With our years of experience in diagnosing and treating vision disorders and diseases such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, amblyopia, presbyopia, dry eyes, cataracts, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, all of the optometrists at our office are qualified to provide appropriate therapeutic routine and medical eye care.

Treatment of Eye Disease

If you are diagnosed with an eye disease, you want the best services available to treat and monitor your condition.  The doctors at Family Eye Clinic, stay current with best treatment practices.  Based on your diagnosis, we may recommend a wide variety of approaces, including nutrition for your eyes, eyelid hygine, prescription medications, therapy and vision exercises or medical procedures.

Good Eyecare Begins With A Yearly Eye Exam!

Although many do not realize it, the best way to protect your vision is with an annual eye exam.  A comprehensive eye exam can instantly detect many health-threatening conditions, such as tumors, vascular irregularities, and diabetes-related complications within the retina.  These are just a few of the reasons Family Eye Clinic recommends that you have an exam each year.

optomap retinal exam
 

In our continued efforts to bring the most advanced technology available to our patients, our team of doctors are proud to announce the inclusion of the Optomap Retinal Exam as an integral part of your eye exam.

Many eye problems can develop without warning and progress with no symptoms. Early on, you might not notice any change in your vision. However, diseases such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinal tears or detachments, as well as other health problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure, can often be detected with a thorough exam of the retina. The retina is the part of your eye that catches the image of what you are looking at, similar to the film in a camera.

An Optomap Retinal Exam provides:

  • A scan to confirm a healthy eye or detect the presence of disease.
  • An overview or map of the retina, giving your eye doctor a more detailed view than he can achieve by other means.
  • The opportunity for you to view and discuss the Optomap images of your eye with your doctor at the time of your exam.
  • A permanent record for your medical file, enabling your optometrist to make important comparisons if potential problems show themselves at a future examination.
lasik
 

Our doctors all work with BioTissue and PROKERA®, a biologic corneal bandage device made with amniotic membrane, used to heal and treat eye diseases such as keratitis, common dry eye, recurrent corneal erosions, filamentary keratitis, persistent epithelial defects, perpetic ulcers, and many other ocular surace diseases.  PROKERA® facilitates healing with less inflammation, pain and scarring.

corneal refractive therapy
 

Corneal Refractive Therapy (CRT) - also known as "Orthokeratology", is a great advancement in refractive therapy for our patients.  CRT allows you to see clearly without glasses or contacts during the day.  Specifically designed therapeutic contact lenses gently reshape the front surface of your eye while you sleep.  Imagine great vision all day without the hassle of glasses or the problems with dust, allergies or dryness that can come while wearing contacts.  This makes CRT ideal for our younger patients who are active in sports and activities.  CRT has also been shown to slow the progression of nearsightedness in children and teenagers.  No more worries about broken frames or torn contact lenses.

We are excited to have the best technology in our office.  Our newest addition is the Optical Coherence Tomography, or OCT .  This technology has changed the way eye care professionals analyze the retina, optic disc  and anterior segment structures of the eye.  This test has the ability to give our doctors the valuable information needed to diagnose and monitor multiple eye conditions (a few listed below) and also assist in the fitting of specialized contact lenses

optovue iwellness p1 iScan
  • age-related macular degeneration
  • macular edema
  • macular hole
  • macular pucker
  • retinal detachments
  • glaucoma
  • central serous retinopathy
  • diabetic retinopathy
  • vitreous traction

Dr. Kerri Shoener, O.D.

Dr. Kerri Shoener is an Optometrist at Family Eye Colorado. She earned her Bachelors of Science degree with honors from the University of South Dakota in 1992 and graduated with honors from Illinois College of Optometry (ICO) in 1996. Her areas of work interest are dry eye, disease management, and family care.

She worked for ten years in the specialty of refractive surgery including Lasik, PRK and RK. She enjoys fitting contacts lenses including specialty contacts for post surgery patients. She has been a consultant for contact lens companies and has been involved in clinical trials.

Dr. Shoener is an active member in good standing of the American Optometric Association and the Colorado Optometric Association. She is an ICO presidential scholar. She is a member of Beta Sigma Kappa optometric honor society and Tomb and Key optometric honor society.

Dr. Shoener enjoys the outdoors of Colorado by snow skiing, mountain biking, and golfing with her husband and two daughters. She especially enjoys travel with family.

Dr. Elizabeth Failla, O.D.

Dr. Elizabeth Failla decided to spend more time with her growing family at home and joined Family Eye Clinic to maintain a balance of her optometric career and her career at home as “mom.” She has spent several years working in refractive surgery and is looking forward to applying the skills she has developed over the past twelve years to better the ocular health of Family Eye Colorado’s patients. In particular, Dr. Failla’s focus includes difficult contact lens fits and the treatment of ocular disease and dry eye management.

Dr. Failla received her undergraduate degree in biology from Indiana University. She continued her education in Indiana graduating from Indiana University’s School of Optometry in 2002 as a member of the Beta Sigma Kappa honor society. Dr. Failla was an assistant instructor for diagnostic management, contact lens care, and completed a rotation in Guanajuato, Mexico providing medical eye care for indigent populations. She went on to complete a residency in ocular disease at Omni Eye Specialists in Denver, and worked with Alcon® Laboratories researching dry eye treatments. Following her residency, Dr. Failla has worked primarily in refractive surgery co-management including LASIK and cataract surgery, and is now enjoying more time going on bike rides through town with her family

Dr. Raza Uddin, O.D.

Dr Raza Uddin earned a bachelors degree in Molecular Biosciences from University of Kansas in 2005 and graduated with clinical honors from the Illinois College of Optometry in 2011. Dr Uddin joined Family Eye Clinic in 2014 and specializes in Pediatrics, Orthokeratology, CRT (Corneal Reshaping Therapy) , Dry Eye treatment, and Keratoconus. He chose optometry as a career because he realized the importance of having clear and comfortable vision as he grew up playing basketball and baseball.

Dr Uddin has extensive training in co-management of Refractive Surgery and ocular diseases such as glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy from his time spent in private practice and Veterans Hospital rotations. He believes it is important for all children to have routine eye exams to assess their binocular vision skills. Many visual issues can cause children to struggle in school and go undetected even if a child can see “20/20”. These visual disorders are disguised as “learning disabilities” when they are actually fully correctable with glasses and vision therapy. 

Dr Uddin is a member of the Colorado Optometric Association, the American Optometric Association, and SVOSH (student volunteer optometric services to humanity).

In his free time, he enjoys outdoor activities such as skiing, hiking, and traveling with his family.

Dr. Katie Jo Sider, O.D.

Dr. Katie "Jo" Sider is a therapeutic optometrist with a focus on dry eye syndrome, post surgical care, and urgant care. She enjoys working with patients of all ages who may need a little extra care due to special needs or learning disabilities. She believes in the importance of patient education as a valuable tool to help her patient's recognize the early signs of a problem, or to just satisfy their curiosities.

Dr. Sider grew up in a small town near Scranton, Pennsylvania and attended the University of Scranton where she achieved her Bachelors of Science in Biology. She graduated from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry (PCO) at Salus University in 2013 where she received her Doctorate in Optometry. During her studies at PCO, she worked in the optics lab as a tutor/ professor's assistant and was a member of SOSH/VOSH where she provided free eye exams to rural areas of El Salvador in the summer of 2011.

Dr. Sider and her husband met in optometry school and moved to Colorado in 2017. In her free time she enjoys hiking, camping, painting, and DIY home renovations.

Welcome to Family Eye Colorado

Elevate your Vision